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February 1, 2017

Today we celebrate:

Decorating With Candy Day - Today you have permission to buy your favorite candy and use your creativity to decorate anything you want with it. Whether it’s food in the form of cupcakes or cookies, or table settings, or glasses….whatever you come up with is ok and will be sure to be delicious.

Car Insurance Day – On this day in 1898, Traveler's Insurance Company issued the first car insurance policy. In 1927, not necessarily on this day, Massachusetts became the first state to make car insurance mandatory.

G.I. Joe Day – Launched by Hasbro in February 1964, G.I. Joe was the first doll that parents found acceptable for their sons to play with, mostly because it was called an “action figure” instead of a “doll”. Parents can be kind of funny about the suggestion that their sons should play with dolls so the creators decided that the term “action figure” would make this toy much more acceptable.

Hula In The Coola Day – On this day, usually more for those of us in the frozen north than for those basking in the warm southern sun (although this year even the southern states seem to be chillier than normal), we should forget about winter by getting rid of the winter coats, turning up the heat in the house, wearing shorts and throwing a luau.

National Serpent Day – Today is a day for all things snakey and slippery. I don't like snakes, but if you do, see if you can find one in your backyard and wish him (or her, I don't know how to tell the difference) a Happy National Serpent Day. You could also play snake related games with your children, I'm sure the internet is full of ideas for you.

National Freedom Day – On this day in 1865, President Abraham Lincoln signed the 13th Amendment to the Constitution outlawing slavery. Major Richard Robert Wright Sr., a former slave, thought that there should be a day for everyone to celebrate the freedom of ALL Americans. He began the National Freedom Association which worked toward accomplishing that goal and highlighting the continuing struggles of the African-Americans fight for equality. The first National Freedom Day was celebrated on this day in 1942 and a wreath was laid at the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia.

Spunky Old Broads Day – This day celebrates any woman over the age of 50 who refuses to let her age dictate how she acts and what she does. I am not fifty years old yet, but when I am, I plan to be very spunky. Do something new and exciting today. Here are a few suggestions.

National Baked Alaska Day – The original Baked Alaska was invented in 1876 by chef-de-cuisine Charles Ranhofer at Delmonico's Restaurant and consisted of ice cream over a sponge cake and topped with meringue, then baked long enough for the meringue to set. It was called Baked Alaska in honor of the recently acquired Alaskan territory. Since then, brave people sometimes add a rum topping and set the thing on fire.

Robinson Crusoe Day – This is a day to be adventurous and self-sufficient. On this day in 1709, the sailor, Alexander Selkirk, who was the inspiration for the book, Robinson Crusoe, was rescued from the island where he had lived on his own for five years. His captain abandoned him there at Alexander's request after they had an argument. It must have been one heck of an argument if he preferred to be abandoned on a deserted island.

National Change Your Password Day – This is a day to keep your computer's security in mind and change your password. It's a good idea to do that now and then, so take the time today to change all of your many passwords. You might want to think about keeping a list of them in a safe location because it will be difficult to remember so many new ones.

National Girls & Women In Sports Day – Women are still often discriminated against in sports. Many people feel that sports played by women are not really sports worthy of watching. This is a day to fight against discrimination in the sporting world and focus on the benefits that girls receive from participating in sports. This day is celebrated on the first Wednesday in February.

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